100+ Hashtags for Painters & Calligraphers, Sorted by Category!

It may be small, but it is mighty. On Instagram, a hashtag can be a powerful thing. Hashtags are not only a way for a social media platform to sort posts into specific topics; it's a way for you to meet other people, discover new tools and resources, keep an eye on trends, get inspired, and more. Choosing your hashtags carefully is important. It affects who will see your own posts on Instagram, but also where you will end up networking in the wider Instagram community. For artists & makers, Instagram can be an especially creative & supportive space to share your work and see what others are doing as well. While I updated my own lists for this year, I thought I would share with you what I found! Below, I'm going to share just shy of 200 hashtags useful for painters & calligraphers specifically. First, though, let's talk about how to use their power for good, not evil.

 
Brush up your hashtag lists with 100+ hashtags specific to painters & calligraphers.

Brush up your hashtag lists with 100+ hashtags specific to painters & calligraphers.

 
  1. Don't use all the hashtags at once. Instagram limits you to 30 hashtags total (including both those in your post description and any comments you add), but they can also be pesky for your followers. It's no fun to have to scroll past a zillion hashtags, or have it right in your face. Be choosy of what you're tagging, and make them the most applicable and meaningful to your post.
  2. Balance the general with the specific. I've shared a lot of very general hashtags (like #art. You can't get more basic than that.) but you should combine these with some that are specific. For instance, if you're using a brush to create lettering with your watercolors you might want to use #brushlettering or if you're painting an scene of a street in New Orleans, adding #neworleans so that people specifically interested in those topics see your post.
  3. Keep them on your phone. Below is a screenshot of a Notes app page on my iPhone, where I keep some general watercolor hashtags saved. If you want to include the hashtags but don't want it to be part of the post that everyone sees as they scroll through their feed, you can use a method to add them in a comment. Some people prefer to use an app such as Notes to create 4 periods on different lines, with the hashtags below that. This way, the comment just shows "..." when people scroll past it, and no one sees the hashtags unless they click to view the comments.
  4. Tag businesses and products you support. If you use products by a specific company and they have a presence on Instagram, you can tag them in your posts. This not only helps your followers know what products you use and recommend and easily learn more about them, but if the business sees they may choose to showcase your work which can lead to more exposure. Some examples are Canson papers @cansonpaper, Kuretake Zig watercolors @kuretakezig_usa, Winsor and Newton paints @winsorandnewton, and Princeton brushes @princetonbrush.
  5. Join a challenge or embrace a weekly theme. There are so many challenges on Instagram for artists & designers! In a challenge, you might tag the leaders of it in your photos as you follow along that week, and may have specific topics and materials to use for certain time frames. For instance, if you are interested in calligraphy, @calligrabasics runs weekly challenges (right now it's "pencil week" so you can join in, get a push to be creative and network with other artists too. If you're finding yourself stumped for what to post about on given days, keep a list of weekly themes handy to reference. Some popular examples include #tbt, #throwbackthursday, and #followfriday.

Keep in mind, if you pull this blog post up on your phone, you can go ahead and copy any of the hashtags below and paste them directly into your notes app to save for later! See my example, just below.

 
 

Creativity

#art #artists #artistsofinstagram #artistoninstagram #artistsoninstagram #artistic #artista #artlife #artwork #fineart #artsandcrafts #artspotted #instaartsy #instaartwork #instaartist #artdaily #artshub #creativeprocess #creativeliving #iamcreative #doodle #inspiration #beautiful #makesomething

Color

#color #colors #colorsplash #colorcrush #colormehappy #colorlove #dscolor #livecolorfully #colorventures

Painting

#paint #painting #paintings #painter #paintsketch #watercolor #watercolour #watercolorpainting #watercolorart #inspiring_watercolors #lovewatercolor #aquarelle #sketchbook #sketch #drawing #landscape #portrait #abstract #abstractpainting #illustration #painteveryday #dailypainting #loosepainting

Pattern & Surface Design

#surfacedesign #pattern #patterns #patterndesign #seamlesspattern #floralpattern #designinspo, #designporn, #designlovers, #designblogger, #designoftheday #designbyme #designyourlife #designinspiration #designyourmind #designed #designoftheday

Floral

#dsfloral #blooooms #rsblooms #floralart #floweraddict #floral #watercolorflowers #botanical #flowery #floralwatercolor

Business & Studio Scenes

#studio #studioscenes #studiolife #studiolove #studiogrind #artlicensing #sneakpeek #wip #entrepreneur #hustle #workhard #smallbiz #mycreativebiz #mycreativelife #onmydesk #whereiwork #creativeentrepeneur #girlboss #smallbusiness

Video

#video #votd #instavideo #watercolorvideo #videoart #tutorial #instavid #instagramvideo #processvideo

Networking

(These hashtags are usually related to a blog or website, and are used for followers to tag and follow along. Below are some of the more popular ones; you can search on Instagram for them and see if they fit your particular style.)

#doitfortheprocess #abmlifeisbeautiful #flashesofdelight #thehappynow #pursuepretty #darlingmovement #wemakecollective #makersgonnamake #cylcollective #makersmovement #makersbiz #creativelifehappylife #abmlifeiscolorful #creativityfound #calledtobecreative #theeverygirl #craftsposure #creativehappylife #creativityfound #artcollective #livethelittlethings #seekthesimplicity #sodomino #acolorstory (if you use the app)

Etsy Seller Networking

(These are useful to connect & network with other sellers and influencers, but not necessarily customers. If you're looking to connect with potential buyers, I would get specific with hashtags, such as #giftideas, #whales or #custompetportrait - whatever your work is about.)

#etsy #etsyseller #etsyshop #etsysuccess #etsylove #etsyart #handmade #handmadegift #shophandmade #shopsmallbusiness #supportsmallbusiness #etsygift #etsyfinds #EtsyStore #shopetsy #buyetsy #etsyhunter #etsyusa #etsysellers #EtsyShopOwner #etsyforall#EtsySale #printshop #gifts #custom #customgift

Blogging

(Make sure to add specific hashtags related to whatever the blog post topic is!)

#blog #blogging #waterblog #ontheblog #linkinprofile #designblogger, #designblog

Calligraphy & Hand Lettering

#handlettering #typography #calligraphy #caligraphy #moderncalligraphy #modernscript #dippen #script #formalcalligraphy #pointedpen #penmanship #penandink #calligrapher #lettering #brushcalligraphy #brushlettering #handlettered #handdrawn #freelancer #freelancediaries #chalkboardart #artoftype #handwrittenfont #font #brushlettered #calligraphyvideo #letteringvideo #dippencalligraphy #calligraphypractice #calligraphypen #learncalligraphy #pointedpencalligraphy #surelysimplelettering

If you're interested in more information on what apps I recommend, check out the 10 business & art apps on my phone right now and my 8 favorite photo and video editing apps.

Well, that's a wrap! I hope these lists have been helpful, and I would love to keep the list growing! What hashtags do you use and recommend? Please share in the comments!

- Dani

12 Ways to Use Those Cool Digital Art Patterns

Right now, it seems like the world is FULL of funky, cool, quirky downloadable patterns. Anything your heart desires has been turned from a painting or linoprint into a pattern; woodland creatures, polka dots of every type and size, floral designs of every possible garden variety... digital art patterns are ubiquitous. Part of the reason must be that they are just so fun to make. After I created a few of my own and listed them in my Etsy shop, it occurred to me... what all do people do with these things?

A few of the uses are obvious, such as putting them on fabric and them sewing with them. After a little research I found there are so many other possibilities, I thought I'd share it with you, too. Surely there is a quirky owl pattern you've been eyeing and have just been waiting for the perfect opportunity?

(FYI, this is not a sponsored post - just my own ideas and links to artists & services I admire!)

12 Ways to Use Digital Art Patterns

1. Fabric. Yep, just like I noted above. With so many designs on the market from so many amazing artists, there's no need to limit yourself to whatever designs your local fabric shop has in stock. You can design a seamless pattern out of your own artwork or purchase a digital one from an online seller and have your own fabric whipped up! The most popular service for this is Spoonflower. While the fabric will likely end up costing more than what you'd pay for something off-the-rack at your local craft store, the design options are just so much better.

 
Spoonflower has an easy-to-use interface, and offers more than just fabric.

Spoonflower has an easy-to-use interface, and offers more than just fabric.

 

2. Home decor. What do you do with all that fabric? Cover your home (and the homes of your loved ones) in it, of course. You can make pillows, tea towels, wallpaper, curtains, dust ruffles for under your bed... you get the idea! Below are two examples of artists who used their painted designs to create a pattern they then applied to home goods. Yao Cheng (one of my favorite artists and sources of inspiration, ever) sells throw pillows and tea towels on Etsy and her own website. Kelly Ventura has worked with Chasing Paper to share her designs on wallpaper.

 
Check out these lovely throw pillows in Yao Cheng's shop

Check out these lovely throw pillows in Yao Cheng's shop

 
 
 
Kelly Ventura's collection on Chasing Paper offers both colorful and muted options

Kelly Ventura's collection on Chasing Paper offers both colorful and muted options

 

3. Invitations & events. Whether you go DIY or work with a designer, there are lots of opportunities to use patterns to add color and interest. Check out the wedding suite below from Freshmint Paperie on Etsy, that uses a pastel floral pattern. You could DIY something similar with a pattern of your own, and for a cohesive look coordinate similar patterns and colors into decorations, favors, or even fabrics at the event.

 
A pattern can make invitations more or less formal, depending on what you choose. I think this suite by Freshmint Paperie strikes a great balance between the two!

A pattern can make invitations more or less formal, depending on what you choose. I think this suite by Freshmint Paperie strikes a great balance between the two!

 

4. Website design. As someone who loves to paint AND blog, this is my favorite way to use a digital pattern, hands-down. You could use one as a background pattern on the site as a whole, but whenever I see someone add it to smaller design elements, I can't help but notice. On Rebecca Atwood's site, pictured below, doesn't the pattern behind the "Join Our Newsletter" just make it stand out? Paper & Oats uses a pattern in some of her blog post images; it's a great idea when you write a blog post but you don't have a photo available that makes sense to share with it. (Side note: Paper & Oats is a great website to check out if you are running your own creative business, she shares so many useful ideas and guides!)

 

 
The neutral pattern on Rebecca Atwood's site keeps it looking professional and calming, but adds so much interest.

The neutral pattern on Rebecca Atwood's site keeps it looking professional and calming, but adds so much interest.

 
 
 
Paper & Oats shows how you can use patterns in your blog post images; I love the modern and professional black & white look.

Paper & Oats shows how you can use patterns in your blog post images; I love the modern and professional black & white look.

 

5. Personalizing electronics. I just recently took 10 minutes to update by iPhone, iPad, and Mac backgrounds and feel a little ridiculous for not doing it before. My favorite source for ready-made iPhone & laptop wallpaper is Design Love Fest's Dress Your Tech series. Below is a great example of using a pattern to make these, so don't be afraid to make your own as well! You can use Canva's templates and not even have to worry about the dimensions.

 

 
This pattern by Melanie Johnson available via Design Love Fest uses a tone-on-tone pattern and is definitely worth a download!

This pattern by Melanie Johnson available via Design Love Fest uses a tone-on-tone pattern and is definitely worth a download!

 

6. Presentations. Whether it's for your own small business, a presentation for a corporation, or a slide show at your kid's graduation there are so many opportunities to improve your PowerPoint slides! Canva offers presentation templates that incorporate free patterns they provide, but you could swap them for a pattern of your own, or just insert a pattern into any PowerPoint or other presentation software you use! My favorite is that watermelon print. I can't imagine a scenario where I sit through a presentation on eating watermelon, but still. It's cute.

 

7. Scrapbooking. Whether you print out the papers for a traditional physical scrapbook or add it to a digital one, patterned paper is a scrapbooking staple. Craft stores may offer a plethora of different papers, but finding ones online open up a lot of more options. You can get as specific as you want; I designed patterns of watercolor cabbage and lettuce, so if you're a... cabbage farmer?... there is a paper just for you! (You might want to google "digital scrapbooking" because there are some pretty cool things out there I had no idea about.)

8. Party decorations. Hop on Pinterest for a ton of inspiration in DIY party banners, cupcake toppers, table centerpieces, and more. You could use your own custom-made patterns or one you've purchased to design and print all sorts of things - I think this can be especially handy for a very specific party theme. If your kid is really into the dentist or moths for instance, why limit their party theme to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles? (Those may have been weird examples.)

9. Art prints. One of my favorite pieces of art hanging in our house is a print-out of sample African patterns I ordered on Etsy years ago. I don't think it was designed with the intention of being framed, but there is something eclectic and different about it that I enjoy. A pattern can work especially well as wall art, because it gives the sense of continuity and fills out the frame in a way most images don't.

 

This navy pattern is so bold and really makes a statement, from Hello Gorgeous Wall Art on Etsy

This navy pattern is so bold and really makes a statement, from Hello Gorgeous Wall Art on Etsy

Amistyle Art Studio on Etsy offers prints of this colorful leaf pattern

Amistyle Art Studio on Etsy offers prints of this colorful leaf pattern

This Scandinavian pattern is modern and really sophisticated, from Stellaire Studio on Etsy

This Scandinavian pattern is modern and really sophisticated, from Stellaire Studio on Etsy

10. Photography backdrops. Whatever you're photographing, an interesting backdrop can make the difference between ending up with a professional, unique image and something amateur. Below you can see examples of using a patterned fabric or paper as a photography backdrop for product images and flat-lays, but a quick search can turn up adorable newborn photos and other subjects using the same techniques. Besides, doesn't that same white background on every single Instagram photo start to look boring?

 

 
Clip It Up a Notch shared their tips & tricks for food photography, using this patterned backdrop

Clip It Up a Notch shared their tips & tricks for food photography, using this patterned backdrop

 
 
 
Pixel Steps shared 20 flat lay photography background ideas including this bold print

Pixel Steps shared 20 flat lay photography background ideas including this bold print

 

11. Personalized gifts. Finding the right gift is always tricky, but personalized ones always feel extra thoughtful. Notebooks and planners make great gifts for just about anyone, but especially someone starting a new job or school where it's likely to be extra-useful. Sonia Cavallini creates and sells various stationary (see below) using her whimsical patterns and sells them on Etsy. If you're looking to make your own, services like Vistaprint can create custom notebooks and make it easy and affordable.

 

 
Check out Sonia's website for more inspiration!

Check out Sonia's website for more inspiration!

 

12. Packaging design. If you're someone to makes & shares things (whether as a hobby or a business) it can be extra fun to offer personalized and creative packaging. Whatever you make (knitted items, candles, homemade spice mixes...) you could incorporate a pattern or design into gift tags, wrapping paper, cards, etc. I've even made holiday gifts for friends and family in bulk, and then added little extra packaging to make it feel special. The tea company Saudade kicks their packaging up about a 1000% with their colorful, bold patterns.

Saudade Tea packaging that is borderline psychedelic

Saudade Tea packaging that is borderline psychedelic

How cheerful are these Saudade tea packages?

How cheerful are these Saudade tea packages?

If you're looking for a good tutorial on how to make your own digital patterns and textures, I highly recommend you check out Teela's tutorials on her blog Every Tuesday, particularly How to Create Hand Drawn Seamless Patterns in Illustrator and Create Seamless Watercolor Patterns in Photoshop.

You can check out some of the digital patterns I've designed myself on my Etsy shop.

Are you a digital pattern designer, or just love to collect them? What all do you use them for?

- Dani

 
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Smart Creative Technology: 10 Business & Art Apps On My iPhone Right Now

I spend a lot of time on my phone. Like, a lot. I’m too scared to use one of those apps that tells you how much time you spend and on what social medias, because I’m sure I’ll learn I have some problems. Despite the complete time suck, I adore my phone. Partly, because of all the artistic & business opportunities it affords me on a daily basis.

 
 

The smart phone I use is an iPhone 7 (I’m very fortunate my day job helps cover some of the cost, and I had a timely upgrade when my iPhone 6 died during holiday sales). I have all of the apps on my phone organized into three pages; the first is my “daily life” apps like those for news, weather, my work calendar and email, Facebook, Fitbit, and more. The middle page is where I have all of my creative business & artistic apps, and the last is for random things like games or grocery store apps I only break out on occasion. You can scroll to the bottom of the post to see how I have organized my work-related apps on my phone, but let's talk about what they are and why I like them!

10 Business & Art Apps for Free or Cheap

Trello: This is my favorite way to make to-do lists as well as list out goals, timelines, and brainstorm blog post ideas. Sometimes I alternate between handwriting on a notepad and using Trello, just to change it up. Trello is so versatile, though, I just keep coming back to it. (Cost: Free, next step up is $9.99/month. Available: Apple & Android)

Notes: Of course, there are a LOT of options for note-taking on devices such as Evernote and OneNote. I've tried different ones over the years, and I've found I'm almost always near a computer and don't need something very robust on my devices. The Notes app comes standard on all iPhones, and for a few basic purposes it meets my needs. Scroll down for a photo of how I save hashtags to paste into Instagram comments using the Notes app. (Cost: Free, standard on iPhones. Available: Apple)

Dropbox: I love Dropbox for a cloud service. It's affordable, easy to use, and I can sync it to everything. I've never had an single issue with their service, and saving all of that room on my hard drive is a must! If you work with Photoshop, Illustrator, or other large files a lot, a cloud-based storage service will eventually become necessary. (Cost: $8.25 per month for an individual, more for a team. Available: Apple & Android)

Buffer: I just started using Buffer about a month ago, and can't imagine going back. After years of getting into a good social media groove and then dropping it when I've felt overwhelmed, Buffer has changed the way I work with Instagram and Pinterest in particular. I'm able to schedule out posts in advance, but still have the flexibility to post things as a go, so it's a good mix. For example, if I've just taken several watercolor process videos and edited them, while I have them right up on my computer I can load them onto Buffer and set them up to post a couple of them a week. No more forgetting where I saved the file, getting busy and then realizing it's been two weeks since I've posted, etc. I've also heard of ViralWoot; has anyone tried both? Do you have a preference? Let me know in the comments, please! (Cost: Free for one social media account per platform, next step up is $10/month. I have two Instagrams, so bumped up to the $10 a month level and it has been great. Available: Apple & Android)

Asana: This is an app I only occasionally use, but when you're managing large projects or collaborating with others, it is just so handy! Asana allows you to break down all of the steps to completing a goal or project, and has calendar views as well as list views. You can set timelines and easily collaborate with others all in one app. I've also heard great things about CoSchedule, especially if you happen to use Wordpress for a website. (Cost: Free for a basic version, next step up is $9.99/month. Available: Apple & Android)

MailChimp: There are a lot of good reasons to offer a newsletter to your fans and followers, and while I don't currently provide one (hopefully soon!), in the past I have used MailChimp and it has been great. MailChimp syncs with almost all social media and eCommerce platforms so you can easily access content, and it can pull information from a list of subcribers, such as from Google Drive, so you don't have to stress over importing information constantly. (Cost: Free, next step up is $10/month. Available: Apple & Android)

Google Analytics: If you have any sort of website or blog (and if you're running a creative business of any sort, you should) Google Analytics is the best and most comprehensive way to track just about everything. You can find out what (and when) content is the most popular for your viewers through page clicks and views, where your traffic is coming from, and even what search engine phrases are leading people to your site. It can even offer demographic information about your viewers, which can help you make marketing decisions too. (Cost: Free. Available: Apple & Android)

Squarespace Blog & Analytics: If your website is through Squarespace, these are part of the app suite that goes along with your account. Likr Squarespace Analytics isn't as robust as Google's, it's easy to use and understand. It can't hurt to get information from different sources. The Squarespace Blog app is convenient to have installed on all of your devices so you can respond to comments, update blog posts, and more all while being away from your computer. Personally, I think it can feel clunky to write blog posts or do significant work within the Blog app, so I stick to the web version for most things whenever possible. (Cost: Apps are free, a Squarespace account depends on your use. Available on Apple, but they have a separate app developed for Android)

Google Drive: Even with a great website service such as Wordpress or Squarespace and an cloud storage such as Dropbox, it can be convenient to keep a Google Drive account. Google Drive is so widely available, when you need to share files with others who may not use iCloud or Dropbox, you can; almost everyone has a Google account. Newsletter services such as Mailchimp use Google Drive to access your list of subscribers, so having that information synced from your website to Google Drive means you not having to do a lot of work to track things. (Cost: Free for 15GB, $1.99/month to go up to 100GB. Available: Apple & Android)

Sell On Etsy: If you have an Etsy shop related to your business, Sell On Etsy makes it possible to respond to customer questions, update listings, and more all while on the go. I would recommend sticking with the regular website for actually setting up the shop or adding new or multiple listings, but the app version means not having to panic when you realize you forgot an address and you're standing at the post-office, or realize an item is no longer available and want to remove the listing right away. (Cost: App is Free, selling on Etsy has fees. Available: Apple & Android)

 
My "business" iPhone apps

My "business" iPhone apps

An example of how I use the "notes" app on the daily basis to copy hashtags into Instagram

An example of how I use the "notes" app on the daily basis to copy hashtags into Instagram

 

Bonus 11th app! Bitly: If you frequently post web links, especially on Twitter where you're limited in how many characters you can use, Bitly can make those long, intimidating links so much more reasonable. It's nice that it is free, and is available on both web and app. I've heard BudURL is a good alternative if you're concerned about cookies and tracking which I've heard is a concern about Bitly for some users. (Cost: Free. Available: Apple & Android)

For even more app-recommendation-goodness, you can check out my 8 favorite photo & video editing apps!

Are there other ways you use technology to be more efficient and get business done while out and about? Any other app suggestions? Please share, I’d love to update this post with reader suggestions!

- Dani

 

Photo by Jens Kreuter on Unsplash